First Black President in North America

Did you know that Mexico was the first country in North America to be led by a Black President, not the United States? That fact may be startling to citizens of a country that thinks of itself as a trail breaker (USA)

In 1829, Vicente Guerrero of African, Mixteca or Tlapaneca and Spanish heritage was named the second president of Mexico. That’s almost 200 years before Barack Obama. Outside the continental Americas in the Caribbean the date is even earlier for the first Black head of state, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, was governor-general of Haiti in 1804!

Here’s the link to my post about Presidente Vicente Guerrero. Click on his name for a summary of his presidency. He was the great emancipator of Mexico, freeing the slaves. That will be key information for next week’s post South to Freedom, about a little known line of the Underground Railroad that led to Mexico!

The Black Seminoles knew about it. Why hasn’t US history covered it?

Gracias for reading Fake Flamenco! ¡Olé! –Rebecca

Vicente_Guerrero,_escultura_de_Abraham_González
Bronze sculpture of Vicente Guerrero, by Abraham Gonzalez, located in Queretaro City. Photo: Mizael Contreras

 

Rebecca Cuningham

15 thoughts on “First Black President in North America

    1. Insightful comment, Rosaliene. Where a more level playing field brought opportunity, Blacks were free to achieve greatness in government, business, art, science; the work that matched their personal talents.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Very interesting and important post. I am so very glad that you have posted this historical information, Rebecca, as I know very little of Mexican history and I am glad to be learning more and more about such times and such persons in the history of a large North American country as is Mexico. Thank you!
    All the best and may you enjoy a lovely weekend!
    Francisco

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your comments. As neighbors, the histories of Mexico and The United States are intertwined like those of brothers and sisters. As I research I like to share what I’ve learned. Rewarding to hear from readers like you. Gracias.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. From what I’m finding in my research for Black History month, we don’t know about these people because of a constant racial bias from those who write it. I know that’s a strong statement and I will own it. But, I have a hard time believing otherwise. The stories I’m finding are incredible but nothing I ever had an inkling existed.

    Very interesting information.

    Like

    1. Thanks, Larry. By these people I think you mean these incredible Black heroes. Yes, I am struck by how carefully Black heroes are excluded from US history. Our national story is not only incomplete, it would not exist without African American contributions.

      Like

  3. Rebecca…do you have a private way to chat. I have an idea for something I’d like to discuss with you before writing it…if you are interested. Feel free to say no, this may be controversial.

    Thanks.

    Like

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